Here Are the 10 Laws and Rules That the Royal Family Is Allowed to Break

Here Are the 10 Laws and Rules That the Royal Family Is Allowed to Break
Cover Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Ben A. Pruchnie

10 Rules the Royal Family Can Overlook

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Chris Jackson
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Chris Jackson

 

Step into the regal realm where the laws of the land bend to accommodate the crown on the head. The British royal family is more than just a symbol of tradition; they're governed by a set of rules that set them apart from the ordinary citizen. From legal exemptions to timeless traditions, join us as we unravel the mysteries and privileges that come with wearing the crown. Here are 10 fascinating rules and laws that illuminate the extraordinary world of the monarchy.

1. The Legal Exemption of the British Monarch

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo By Chris Jackson
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo By Chris Jackson

 

In the UK, the king or queen has a special legal status. They have something called sovereign immunity. It means they can't be taken to court or arrested for anything. This rule applies not just to the current monarch, but also to future ones. Even though they're immune from legal action, they must follow the law like everyone else. This is important to remember, especially when examining royal family events. So, while they might not face the same legal consequences as regular people, they still have to play by the rules, as per Insider.

2. British Royal Family Doesn't Have to Obey Speed Limits

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Neil Hall - WPA Pool
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Neil Hall - WPA Pool

 

The British royal family has a special perk when they're on the road: they don't have to follow the normal speed limits. But there's a catch—they can only do this when they're being driven by police officers on official royal duties. There was a picture of Queen Elizabeth II driving her Range Rover at the Royal Windsor Horse Show in July 2021. While regular people have to stick to speed rules, the royal family can speed up or slow down as they like. This special rule comes from the Road Traffic Regulation Act. It says that certain emergency vehicles, like those carrying royals, can ignore speed limits. So, when the king, prime minister, or other royal family members are working, they don't have to worry about following the usual traffic laws, as per Time.

3. King Charles and Queen Consort Camilla's Passport Protocol

Cover Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Chris Jackson
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Chris Jackson

The name of the monarch appears on every passport that is issued in the United Kingdom. According to the royal family website, this meant that Queen Elizabeth didn't require her passport to travel. According to the royal family website, every other member of the family has a passport of their own. The Evening Standard revealed in February that new passports were being changed to show King Charles as the new sovereign in the wake of her passing. The article also stated that passports bearing Queen Elizabeth's name will remain valid until their expiration date.

4. Queen Elizabeth II's Unique License Exemption

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Max Mumby
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Max Mumby

During World War II, Queen Elizabeth trained as a mechanic and driver for the Women's Auxiliary Territorial Service at the age of 18. Because all driver's licenses in the UK are issued in the monarch's name, she never had to take an actual driving test and she was also permitted to drive without a number plate, according to the Daily Express. According to The Mirror, King Charles is the new monarch and is therefore exempt from the need to possess a driver's license.

5. Royal Naming: No Last Name Required!

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Tim Graham
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Tim Graham

 

The British royal family, including figures like King Charles and Prince William, often forego the use of their legal last names, a practice deeply rooted in tradition. Though they theoretically have a last name, the royal family is exempt from using it. The male line descendants of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip now have the last name Mountbatten-Windsor, according to the royal family website. Before 1917, members of the British royal family had no surname. Despite having a legal surname, the royals primarily use their titles and given names, which carry significant historical and cultural weight.

6. Understanding Who Holds Legal Authority Over Grandchildren in Monarchy

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Chris Jackson
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Chris Jackson

 

The monarch has automatic legal custody of all of his descendants, including his minor grandkids, but ordinary grandparents must apply to the courts for custody of their grandchildren. According to royal historian Marlene Koenig, the monarch is legally responsible for raising their grandchildren, as per News, 2018. Thus, Prince George, Prince Charlotte, and Prince Louis of Prince William and Kate Middleton, as well as Prince Archie and Princess Lilibet of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry, are officially under Charles's custody. Even though it's improbable that the king will ever take his grandkids away from their parents, this 300-year-old rule is still in effect.

7. Royal Tax Exemptions: Financial Privileges of Monarchy

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Tim Graham Picture Library
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Tim Graham Picture Library

Within the intricate framework of royal finances, certain exemptions from taxation afford members of the royal family unique privileges. As Insider previously revealed, Queen Elizabeth made voluntary contributions on income, assets, and earnings not used for official purposes, even though the monarch is not constitutionally compelled to pay taxes. According to a September Guardian article, King Charles would not be required to pay taxes on any assets he inherited from his mother. The article also stated that he is anticipated to pay income tax, following in the late monarch's footsteps.

8. Royal Exemption from Jury Duty

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Dan Kitwood
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Dan Kitwood

Being part of the royal family comes with a myriad of privileges, one of which includes exemption from jury duty. In most cases, skipping jury duty in the UK carries a punishment of up to ?1,000, or around $1,200. But jury duty is not mandatory for the king or any member of his immediate family. This exemption was confirmed by The Guardian, highlighting a special treatment reserved solely for royalty. the royal family enjoys the freedom from this obligation, allowing them to focus on their official duties and responsibilities without the constraints of jury service.

9. Royal Traditions: Dual Birthdays of Monarchs

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Justin Tallis - WPA Pool
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo by Justin Tallis - WPA Pool

 

The official website of the royal family states that Queen Elizabeth celebrated two birthdays a year. Her official public birthday celebration is on the second Saturday in June. Where her actual birthday is on April 21. Sovereign monarchs have celebrated their birthdays in public on days other than their actual birthdays for generations. Particularly if their true birthdays come in the fall or winter. According to the royal family website, this is to improve the likelihood of pleasant weather for the yearly Trooping the Colour parade.

10. Monarchy's Exemption from the Freedom of Information Act

Image Source: Getty Images | Photo Yui Mok - Pool
Image Source: Getty Images | Photo Yui Mok - Pool

"The Royal Household is not a public authority within the meaning of the FOI Acts, and is therefore exempt from their provisions," according to the royal family's website. The royal family can now maintain greater discretion over their daily activities and finances according to this rule. For example, the royal family publishes an annual financial report. The UK public is not allowed to view the details of its expenditures. This exemption ensures the preservation of royal privacy. It also raises questions about transparency and accountability within the institution.

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